Arthur’s Seat Walk, Edinburgh

Name of walk Arthur's Seat Walk, Edinburgh
Date of walk 2017-01-21

We arrived on our four day trip to Edinburgh in blue skies and sunshine. We had come to view the Turner paintings in the Scottish National Gallery, which are only on view in January due to the low light levels. As it was such a nice day, after dropping off our bags and having some lunch, we decide on a walk up Arthur’s Seat for the panoramic views of the city. So we strolled down the Royal Mile in the sunshine.

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The Scottish Parliament, designed by Enric Miralles, opened in 2004.

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View out towards Salisbury Crags from outside The Scottish Parliament.

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We take the footpath beneath the upper cliffs of Salisbury Crags known as The Radical Road. It was built in the 1820s by impoverished radical weavers under the direction of Sir Walter Scott and is referenced in the tongue twister "Round and round The Radical Road The Radical Rascal ran".

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The cloud was beginning to come in.

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Edinburgh Castle through murky cloud.

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There was still some blue sky and sunshine left.

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Salisbury Crags.

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Arthur's Seat comes in to view on the left still with a view, but the cloud is getting ever closer. Our way up is the diagonal path going off to the right.

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Brendan decides that the climb would be too much for his knees, so I continue on by myself.....and hundreds of others!

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When I got towards the top there was no view left, but I continue on anyway to the summit which is just ahead after a small descent.

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The cloud is coming in in waves, so I take a photo of the summit while it was relatively visible.

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The hill was packed with students, both British and foreign. Unsuitable footwear was rife. Some girls were in heels! I was wearing walking trainers, but even I found the descent decidedly slippery in the damp. I would not want to do this in shoes with smooth soles.

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View back the way I had come.

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A view of sorts.

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The sun visible through the cloud.

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I head down below the cloud.

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Heading back towards Salisbury Crags.

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Brendan is down there somewhere.

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I meet up with Brendan and this time we walk back under Salisbury Crags.

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Back to The Scottish Parliament, rather Gaudiesque.

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One of the downsides of visiting Edinburgh in January is the lack of daylight, so we went to many places in the dark. Edinburgh Castle.

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The Camera Obscura.

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The Scott Monument. The Railway Station, Edinburgh Waverley, is the only station to be named after a book.

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Inside the monument is a statue of Sir Walter Scott with his dog, Maida. The outside of the monument incorporates over 60 statuettes of characters from his books.

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The Royal Scottish Academy and behind it The Scottish National Gallery which we will visit tomorrow to view the Turners.

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View back up to Edinburgh Castle.

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High Kirk of St Giles, St. Giles' Cathedral. It is Norman with the spire added in the 16th century.

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The altar is central.

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The organ was designed by Rieger Orgelbau.

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The Thistle Chapel, which has a stall for each of the 16 Knights of the Thistle.

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John Knox was its first Protestant minister after the Reformation.

A pity there were no panoramic views from the top of Arthur’s Seat, but at least it means that I’ll have to return and try again! Thankfully we got some great views of the city when we walked up Carlton Hill, and for much less effort! (See Edinburgh Walks post)

Jo.

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