Burnbank, Blake & Gavel Fells

Name of walk Burnbank, Blake & Gavel Fells
Date of walk 2020-11-19

The weather has been wet and windy for a couple of weeks, but finally we have a good day, so myself and Brendan drove to the parking spaces at Fangs Brow, above Loweswater, to walk up to Burnbank Fell, Blake Fell and Gavel Fell, returning via High Nook Tarn and the high level terrace path. A grassy (boggy!) walk of eight miles.

01

The path that leads towards Burnbank Fell on the right. The cloud cover is total, so despite the good visibility it is very dull. Hopefully this will improve!

02

Belted Galloways with Loweswater, Whiteside and Grasmoor behind.

03

Our grassy route up the fell.

04

View back to Fangs Brow.

06

There is a cairn to mark a view point. Views over to Darling and Low Fell on the left. Loweswater below then Crummock Water to the right.

07

Excellent visibility. Views across the Solway Firth towards Criffel.

08

Burnbank summit ahead. The summit of Blake Fell on the left.

09

Burnbank Fell summit cairn is on the other side of the fence. We are happy to admire it from a distance! We head on towards Blake Fell.

10

Looking back to Brendan and Burnbank Fell as we head up towards Blake Fell.

11

The summit shelter on Blake Fell.

12

Looking down on Knock Murton and Cogra Moss.

13

A man and his young son looking over to Ennerdale Water. Crag Fell and Grike behind.

14

A close up view of Buttermere and Fleetwith Pike.

15

Summit selfie.

16

View across to Whiteside, Hopegill Head and Grasmoor. Skiddaw on the far left.

17

We head down into the dip then the climb up to Gavel Fell. Behind Gavel Fell is Great Borne. On the left is High Stile, Red Pike and Pillar.

18

View back to Blake Fell from the slopes of Gavel Fell. It is very wet underfoot! In the summer months this route is always one to stride out on, currently we have to keep avoiding the boggy sections.

19

The cloud is beginning to clear. Blue skies above Knock Murton and out to sea.

20

Gavel Fell summit.

21

We head down the ridge of Gavel Fell, a new route for me.

22

Hen Comb and behind that is Mellbreak.

23

Sunshine! A wide angle view with Blake Fell on the left and behind that is Carling Knott. Gavel Fell ridge on the right.

24

The cairn on the Gavel Fell ridge.

25

More views to Buttermere, but this time in blue skies!

26

Close up of Buttermere and Fleetwith Pike.

27

A panorama of the view from Gavel Fell ridge. Left click to enlarge, click again to return.

28

Hen Comb in the foreground.

29

Whiteside, Hopegill Head, Grasmoor, Eel Crag and Whiteless Pike, with Mellbreak in front.

30

View to Loweswater, Carling Knott on the left.

31

I head to the edge of Black Crag to look down on High Nook Tarn in the shade.

32

Then I head back to the main path and continue down the ridge.

33

A great view.

34

High Nook Tarn is getting closer.

35

Brendan continues on to meet the terrace path while I divert across the terrain to the tarn. Even though the tarn is in shade, the fact that Carling Knott is still in sunshine should make for some great photos.

36

The view from the far side of High Nook Tarn is stunning. There is no wind so the reflections are wonderful.

37

Panorama. Left click to enlarge, click again to return. The zig-zag route through the bracken up to Blake Fell on the left.

38

39

Panorama. Left click to enlarge, click again to return.

40

I only stay for a few minutes as I have to catch Brendan up, but it was well worth the detour!

41

I head up the terrace path towards Holme Wood.

42

View back from the terrace path. This path takes us all the way back to my car.

43

We stop at the seat and take this photo of the view over Loweswater, now in shadow as the sun goes behind the fells.

44

Brendan admiring the view.

45

The seat with a view! It was getting chilly out of the sunshine, so we continued on.

46

Just like this morning, by the time we had returned to the car the cloud had returned and the sun had disappeared below the hills.

An easy walk with superb views, but would have been better after a dry spell! The eight mile walk took us five hours and fifteen minutes.

 

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