Cross Fell

Name of walk Cross Fell
Date of walk 2019-06-10
Distance walked (miles) 10
Duration of walk 7 hours 0 minutes
Weather Blue skies and sunshine
Peaks on walk Cross Fell
Walked with Brendan and Tom
Parking Kirkland Church

On Monday myself, Brendan and son, Tom, did a circular walk up to Cross Fell, the highest point of the Pennines. We parked in Kirkland, by the church. It was to be a ten mile walk.

01

St. Lawrence, Kirkland.

02

We walked through Kirkland village taking the track on the left.

03

04

Its a long walk in to the fell on the left of picture.

05

Curious sheep.

06

Self-shearing sheep.

07

We take the old miners track up the fell. Brown Hill on the left. Our route skirts round the side of High Cap as we climb.

08

Looking back across the Eden Valley to the distant fells of the Lake District some twenty miles away.

09

10

Black Doors, the darker rock section on the side of Brown Hill is part of the Whin Sill. This is a a geological formation of hard rock that runs from here to the east coast. It features again at High Cup Nick.

11

We pass some disused mine workings.

12

Tom waits for us to catch him up.

13

Our first sighting of Cross Fell summit since we started the climb.

14

Some great views back to the lake land fells.

15

Shelter on the route.

16

We sit outside for a drink.

17

We follow the cairns.

18

We walk all the way to the big cairn and take the Pennine Way up to the summit. View north.

19

The route up is very boggy and wet. Tom at the first cairn, with Brendan in the distance.

20

Me at the second cairn.

21

Approaching the Ordnance Survey Trig Point and the huge summit shelter.

22

Tom wrings out his socks. Yes it was that boggy! The shelter has been recently rebuilt.

23

Close up photo of the Radar installation on the adjacent Great Dun Fell.

24

Some good views out.

25

Ullswater peeking out.

26

It is windy and rather cold on the summit, we choose the quarter of the summit with the most shelter from the wind to eat lunch.

27

I put my coat on and add the bottoms to my shorts.

28

We head off down the other side of Cross Fell, following the cairns roughly in the direction of the Radar Station.

29

Cow Green Reservoir.

30

The Radar Station on the right.

31

Some of the cairns marking the Pennine Way are rather large! Tom leads the way.

32

Paving stones make up the pathway through this peaty section of the route. Little and Great Dun Fell ahead.

33

Look out for this stone. It marks the crossroads of two paths. A signpost representing the Pennine Way (PW) and the smaller bridle way (horseshoe). We take the bridle way, which is a bit boggy!

34

Eventually we get past the bog and can stride out on grass. Tom in the distance.

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Heading below Wildboar Scar. Burney Hill, Knock Pike and Dufton Pike are the three minor grassy peaks in the distance.

37

As we pass the base of Grumply Hill we meet some Highland cattle with very pointy horns!

38

39

Heading down beside Littledale Beck.

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Thankfully the cattle move off the track.

44

Looking back up.

42

Wythwaite.

43

The unusually named 'Hanging Walls of Mark Anthony', which were former Cultivation Terraces.

45

Heading for the farm.

46

47

We pass through the farm. Pet lambs.

48

Heading back towards Kirkland,

An easy enough walk, but a bit boggy in places. Best not to do it, like we did, after a period of extended rain. The walk was 9.7 miles long. It took us just under seven hours, but we did a lot of sitting around.

Jo.

 

 

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