Great Worm Crag & Green Crag

Name of walk Great Worm Crag & Green Crag
Date of walk 2020-06-01

I’ve not left the house for two weeks, being too busy weeding and planting out all the plants that I’ve grown from seed. Now I’ve finished I thought I’d combine Great Worm Crag and Green Crag from the Birker Fell Road. A walk where I was unlikely to see anyone. I arrived early to nab the one convenient car parking space and to ensure I was back to my car before midday, as the weather was very hot. The walk would also include Rough Crag and White How, and was just over five miles in length. Great Worm Crag is an Outlying Fell, but Green Crag is a Wainwright and one that I have visited on many occasions, but usually with Harter Fell as the main objective.

01

As soon as I parked my car and got out the cattle arrived to see what I was doing. I took this photo of them lined up along the roadside

02

They were on the bit that I needed to access, so I had to take a circuitous route, but then they started to follow me, so I hot-footed it, hoping that cattle are disinclined to run uphill. Thankfully I was right and they went back to eating grass. View back to my car and Hesk Fell.

03

Rough Crag ahead, my first point of call.

04

A Meadow Pipet.

05

From my high viewpoint I watched the cattle surround a car. They refused to move. I could hear a horn hooting for several minutes before the cattle got bored and moved on.

06

Rough Crag summit, looking over to Devoke Water.

07

A closer view.

08

View back down to where I parked and across to The Pike and Hesk Fell.

09

Very clear views to Kirk Fell, Scafell and Scafell Pike.

10

Scafell, Scafell Pike, Slight Side, Ill Crag and Esk Pike.

11

Looking over Great Crag to Red Pike, Yewbarrow, Pillar and Kirk Fell.

12

View out to the Duddon Estuary.

13

My route ahead to Great Worm Crag.

14

Looking back to Rough Crag as I pass lots of old cairns shown on the OS map.

15

Summit of Great Worm Crag with Green Crag on the right.

16

Summit view to Devoke Water.

17

Isle of Man on the left.

18

Green Crag, Harter Fell and White How.

19

Close up of Low Birker Tarn.

21

I head off for White How.

22

The path becomes intermittant after a while.

23

Looking across the moss to Green Crag on the right.

24

Approaching White How.

26

The Duddon Estuary summit view.

28

Dow Crag and Walna Scar.

29

The route ahead to Green Crag, which is easy.

30

The path goes through the crags.

31

Up and around to the left.

32

The summit is gained on the right.

33

Green Crag summit with Devoke Water and Sellafield.

34

Low Birker Tarn. Behind it is Boot and Eskdale Moor then Whin Rigg.

35

Summit view towards Harter Fell.

36

I move away from the summit cairn to get a better view of Harter Fell's surroundings.

37

On the left is Haycock, Scoat Fell, Red Pike and Pillar, then the Scafells.

38

Not a bad view for a break. Scafell, Scafell PIke, Ill Crag, Esk Pike, Bowfell and Harter Fell.

39

Stickle Pike and the Duddon Estuary.

40

Close up of Bowfell and Esk Pike.

41

Close up of Scafell, Slight Side, Scafell Pike and Ill Crag.

42

View across to Devoke Water.

43

For the route back I head down from Green Crag and go directly back across the moss to Great Worm Crag. The weather has been so dry that the going is very easy.

44

Another Meadow Pipet, thanks to Rev. Martin for helping with identification.

45

View back across the moss to Green Crag.

46

Rowantree Beck.

47

Sheep on a crag.

48

Last view back to Green Crag.

49

Back on Great Worm Crag.

50

This time I head straight down to my car.

51

Crossing Freeze Beck.

The 5.2 mile walk took me three hours and thirty minutes. I never saw anyone! An easy walk for a day with good visibility and a lengthy spell of dry weather. Not a walk to try in mist or after prolonged rain. The roads were very busy on the way home. The world and his wife were parked by Duddon Bridge, you’d not know there was a pandemic going on.

Jo.

 

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