Loughrigg Fell & Rydal Water

Name of walk Loughrigg Fell & Rydal Water
Date of walk 2018-10-18
Distance walked (miles) 5
Duration of walk 4 hours 20 minutes
Weather Glorious!
Peaks on walk Loughrigg Fell
Walked with On own
Parking By Rydal Hall

Thursday was another glorious day. The 6.30am Radio Cumbria ‘Fells forecast’ said there was mist in the valleys, so a thermal inversion was on the cards. The blue skies meant that it would also be a great day to capture the autumn colours. So I headed for Rydal Water, parking on the road in between St. Mary’s Church and Rydal Hall.  Be aware that this road has experienced recent water damage, the pot holes are prolific and some sections are coned off. My route would take me to Rydal Water shore. Then up to Rydal Cave, following the high level Path to Loughrigg Terrace, then the pitched path up to Loughrigg Fell. I would return to the terrace and take the low level path back to Rydal Shore.

01

I stopped at Waterhead, on the side of Windermere. The mist was being burned off by the sunshine.

02

It still persists in the centre.

03

04

The sunshine was taking longer to reach Rydal Water. Across from the Badger Bar is the path through the wall and over the bridge to Rydal Water shore. The mist made for an eerie setting.

05

The total lack of air movement meant that the reflections of the trees were mirror-like.

06

I moved around the lake shore to where I would be opposite the boathouse. The Top of Nab Scar could be seen in blue sky above.

07

08

I will return here on the way back.

10

As I climbed up to the high level route the thermal cloud inversion became clearer.

11

This is taken from the grassy knoll outside Rydal Cave. I am now above the inversion, but it was clearing rapidly.

12

Rydal Cave.

13

There are fish in the water. The cave is man made.

14

View out. Tree reflection in the cave water.

15

The inversion is burning off. The low level path that I will return by, is below.

16

Looking down on Grasmere from Loughrigg Terrace.

17

I head up the pitched path. Finally I'm out of the shade and into the sunshine. This photo is taken from about a quarter of the way up. You don't have to go to the summit for the best view.

18

Just as it reach the summit I'm joined by a jovial and friendly group from a local Outdoor Education Centre. I thought they were probably Duke of Edinburgh Award students, but when their leader asked them what the column was, no one knew! Slap on the wrist geography teachers! A student asked me, so I whispered "Trig point" (OS Triangulation Point). He got his brownie points for both the answer and for using all available resources.....me!

19

Coniston Old Man, Weatherlam, Swirl How and Great Carrs above Elterwater.

20

Bowfell, Great End and the Langdale Pikes looking rather wonderful today!

21

Looking down on Elterwater village.

22

Chapel Stile with Lingmoor Fell on the left and Crinkle Crags above it.

23

The group of students had moved off to navigate their own way to Rydal Cave. Whether they made it...who knows! So I can finally take a photo of the Trig Point, and contrary to what they believed, the metal bit on the very top is not an ashtray!

24

Looking down Lake Windermere from Loughrigg summit.

25

I move to one of the other tops to get a view down to Loughrigg Tarn. Black Crag behind it.

26

View along the length of Loughrigg's undulating top.

27

The route back down. Dunmail Raise is the dip. Lonscale Fell in the distance. I had got chatting to the two very entertaining gentlemen in the photo. Bill from Enniskillen, who now lives in Chester and his friend from Nottingham. It was Bill's first Wainwright, but his friend was an old hand.

28

The route back down, which was easy going up, is awkward to descend, due to the sloping steps. Don't attempt this in ice!

29

Looking down on the weir.

30

Loughrigg Terrace.

31

Grasmere from the Terrace.

32

I take the low level route. The ruin would make a great holiday home!

33

Nab Scar and Rydal Water from the path behind the wall.

34

I reach the shore line.

35

Wonderful colours and reflections.

36

A two photo shot of Nab Scar. Left click to enlarge, click again to return.

37

Quite idyllic.

38

39

The boathouse in the distance.

40

Close up.

41

43

Another two shot panorama from just before the gate in the wall that leads into the woods. Left click to enlarge, click again to return.

44

In the woods I skirt the shore.

45

Back to where I was this morning. Same photo, no mist!

46

47

Back to the start of the shoreline, same photo as this morning.

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49

Back over the bridge for a drink in the Badger Bar. It was still warm enough to sit outside.

50

St. Mary's Church was built in 1824.

51

William Wordsworth, who was then living at Rydal Mount, helped to choose the site for the church, which was originally an orchard, and he composed two poems for the occasion. The Wordsworth pew is the one in front of the pulpit, and was used by the Wordsworth family for a quarter of a century. Wordsworth himself, who had been Chapelwarden in 1833, attended service for the last time on Sunday, 10 March 1850. Two days later he was taken ill, and died on April 23rd.

A superb day to be out on the fells or in the valleys! The walk was 5.6 miles, and including the stop in the pub, took me fours hours and twenty minutes.

Jo.

 

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