High Dam & Finsthwaite Tower

Name of walk High Dam & Finsthwaite Tower
Date of walk 2023-12-01

We parked opposite the weir near The Swan Hotel at Newby Bridge, in time for the sunrise. We would then walk to High Dam and Finsthwaite Tower.

01

The sun rises over Newby Bridge at 8.30am.

02

A closer view.

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Looking across the River Leven.

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The weir.

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View from Newby Bridge.

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From the grounds of The Swan Hotel.

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Heading back to Newby Bridge. The Moon in the sky.

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We cross the railway bridge and head left, eventually we head uphill through the woods and come out to the field.

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The stile leading from the woods into the fields.

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The Moon.

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We follow the markers across several fields.

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St. Peter's Church Finsthwaite.

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Once in the village we take the public footpath through a garden into the field of cows and a bull.

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One of the cows, we move swiftly along the path.

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There are sheep too.

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We cross the footbridge towards High Dam.

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A partly frozen High Dam.

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We do a clockwise circuit.

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There are many excellent reflections today.

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Ged on the footbridge.

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We are now heading up to the high point.

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View from the high point.

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Two dogs at the high point having a tug of war with a big stick.

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A hungry Robin by the seat.

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Ged on the boardwalk.

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Low Dam

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We walk back to the church and cross the fields to High Knott Wood.

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Storm Arwen in 2021 destroyed the ancient woodland view.

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Views to Lake Windermere. The route is now fenced in.

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Our route up to Summer House Knott. A year ago it was blocked.

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Now there are new deer fences, and gates.

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We make our way to Finsthwaite Tower. The tower was built in 1799 by James King of Finsthwaite House as an ornament to the landscape, and as a monument to naval prowess.

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View inside the tower.

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Just by the tower three new memorial stones have been erected, each commemorating a great naval battle: Cape St Vincent (1797), Camperdown (1797) and the Nile (1798).

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We follow the path back through the woods which comes out on the path we took this morning.

The walk was just under six miles and took about four hours, no difficulties.

Jo.

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