Bellringers’ Walk Pendragon Castle

Name of walk Bellringers' Walk Pendragon Castle
Date of walk 2017-05-13

On Saturday the St. James’ bellringers joined fellow ringers of the Furness and South Lakeland branch, at Kirkby Stephen in the afternoon. On our way we rang at Orton Church at 10am and visited the Farmers’ Market and Chocolate Shop. In between ringing we did our walk. After three weeks of sunshine, it was raining and there was low cloud, so our planned walk up to Nine Standards via Coldbergh Edge was replaced by a low level walk in the vicinity of Pendragon Castle.

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As it was raining we had a quick look around the Farmers' Market then went straight to Kennedy's Chocolate Shop and cafe. You can watch them making their handmade chocolates through the windows in the cafe. Cameron had recommended their hot chocolate with cream and marshmallows. Sue and I had regular ones, the boys had large.

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I bought some chocolate cats and a mouse.

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We returned to the Farmers' Market before heading for All Saints Church.

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The earliest fabric in the church dates from the later part of the 12th century. The tower was built in the early 16th century and is undergoing repairs. It has a ring of eight bells.

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View from the ringing room. The right side of the church was being used as a cafe.

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We were the first ringers up the stairs. We were also joined by others including Karen from Kendal and Melvin.(AP)

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Group photo (AP) taken by Karen. While exploring outside the church I ran into Tom, Tower Captain at Urswick, he was on a train spotting trip so didn't have time to ring with us.

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Are those bullet holes on the left? Any last requests, Sue?

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The Ellacombe apparatus, an easy way to ring the bells....a little hammer gives each stationary bell a dong when you pull the string. The bells can be rung by just one person.

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View into the ringing room from the church. Surprisingly the bells could barely be heard in the church.

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The two harpists said they only knew the bells were ringing because they could see us through the glass window.

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I chatted with Mary and Christopher Jenkin and their son, Ross. Rev. Jenkin used to be vicar of St. Paul's in Barrow. I used to teach Ross and thought he'd probably be late twenties now....turns out he is 36, a policeman, and that is his wife and daughter with him.....how time flies!

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Orton is on Wainwright's 'Coast to Coast' walk route.

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We drive towards Kirkby Stephen, then head off down past Nateby to Pendragon Castle. According to legend, the castle was built by Uther Pendragon, father of King Arthur.

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Sheep are the current occupants!

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Lots of nooks and crannies to explore.

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The castle was built in the 12th century by Ranulph de Meschines, during the reign of King William Rufus. It has the remains of a Norman keep, with the later addition of a 14th-century garderobe turret, and some further additions in the 17th century. One of its most notable owners was Sir Hugh de Morville, Lord of Westmorland – one of the four knights who murdered St Thomas Beckett in 1170.

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Andy, Cameron and Jason.

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A panorama of the view south. Left click to enlarge, click again to return. Mallerstang Edge on the left, Wild Boar Fell on the right. We would be heading this way on our walk beside the river.

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View from the other side of the moat.

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We head off to cross the bridge over the river, passing this sign....dangerous squirrels? We will keep a look out.

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View back to the castle, the skies are looking ominous!

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The peak of Wild Boar Fell.

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There are some lovely properties around here.

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We head for Shoregill.

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Lots of lambs about.

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This one has yet to grow into his ears.

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We pass through a farm and cross back over the river.

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We head for the church.

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St. Mary Mallerstang was founded in the early 14th century by Lady Idonea de Veteripont – but, having fallen into disrepair, was restored by Lady Anne Clifford in 1663, who also owned and restored Pendragon Castle.

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A milk churn used as a collecting tin.

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The bell turret contains a 13th century bell.

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At Outhgill we spot one of those dangerous Red Squirrels, we keep our distance, least we be attacked!

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We walk back to Pendragon Castle on the road. Then head back to Kirkby Stephen for coffee and cake.

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We parked directly outside the cafe.

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As we head for the church, we can hear the bells ringing. (AP)

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The cloisters in front of the church.

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St Stephen's is shared between the Anglican and Roman Catholic population of Kirkby Stephen, holding both Anglican Communion and Roman Catholic Mass. It was built in 1240. The church has eight bells.

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Looking towards the ringing room.

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View from the ringing room.

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Cameron and Andy.

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They were ringing Plain Bob Major.

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Looking up to the ringing room.

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Some of the stones on show in the church date from Viking and Saxon times

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The north or Wharton chapel has a late sixteenth century altar tomb with effigies of Thomas Wharton, 1st Baron Wharton and his 2 wives.

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Andy's rather unflattering photo of me ringing the tenor. Amazingly I neither went wrong nor improvised!

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Group photo before we drive back to Barrow. We all seem to be roughly the same height....that's not what the boxes are for, Sue!

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On Sunday morning we join in the 'Big Breakfast' at St. James', to raise money for Christian Aid, before ringing for Sunday service.

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And very nice it was too. Cooked by Frank with waiter service by organist and choirmaster, Mark.

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It is quite difficult to ring bells when you're stodged!

Thanks to Andy for the use of a few of his photos, and for being our chauffeur! A very good day out.

Jo.

 

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