Dalton St. Mary’s Bell Ringers on Tour

Name of walk Dalton St. Mary's Bell Ringers on Tour
Date of walk 2014-10-25

On Saturday the 25th of October Dalton St Mary’s bell ringers and friends held their annual Tower Outing. This year we would venture to Lancashire and North Yorkshire visiting bell towers in Whittington, Gargrave, Kirkby Malham and Giggleswick.

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Our first church visit was to St. Michael the Archangel at Whittington-in-Lonsdale. A Grade ll listed building. The church stands within the bailey of a former castle. It is thought that a church has been on this site since 1200. The oldest part of the present church is the bell tower, which dates from the early 16th century. The rest of the church was largely rebuilt in 1875

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Photo taken from the sundial.

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In the churchyard is a sundial with a base dated 1641 in sandstone with a brass plate and gnomon. It has been listed at Grade II. It stands on the summit of the former motte which I stood on to take the previous photo.

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To commemorate the millennium of 2000, a mosaic by Maggie Howarth was installed at the entrance to the churchyard.

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There is a ring of six bells. The oldest of these was cast in 1739 by Edward Seller II, the next in 1754 by Abel Rudhall, and the other four in 1875 by John Taylor & Co. The bells are rung from the ground floor. They are very quiet, until you venture outside.

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The black metal structure above the ringers is to guide the ropes, if it wasn't there the sallies would come down all over the place.

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Tower Captain, Stan with his sister Evelyn, Jacqueline and Linda. (AP)

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Andy took this photo, we are ringing Grandsire Doubles. I rang the tenor.

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Next up is St. Andrew's in Gargrave. Rebuilt in 1852, the Church still has its original tower from 1500's which allegedly had re-used stone from a nearby Roman Villa.

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It has a ring of eight bells. I had a go on the tenor to Plain Bob.

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Andy took this one.

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The font and organ

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It has some excellent stained glass.

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There was a farm at the end of the grave yard, plus a section of old gravestones laid flat, dating from the early 1800's.

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Out front was a sign for the Pennine Way.....so tempting! Today is for Bells, not Fells!

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Lunch turned out to be a bit of a Treasure Hunt! We had booked at the Craven Heifer, but there turned out to be three Craven Heifers within a very small area, and we all turned up at the wrong one! Luckily it just a small detour to the right one in Addingham. Stan stood outside the correct Craven Heifer! (AP)

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A bit of a tight squeeze! (AP)

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(AP)

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(AP)

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Not everyone could manage to sit around the main table, so the management created a 'Naughty Boy's Table', where, naturally, Alan and Andy were placed.

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Stan makes a speech.....Owen looks riveted!

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The pub had milk churns as urinals, and the lids were used to hold towels. Cool! Naturally, I did not take this photo, I got Alan to take it for me, honest!

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After lunch we headed off to another St. Michael the Archangel in Kirkby Malham. It is Grade l listed. It is thought that the church originated no later than the 9th century, and possibly as early as the 7th century. The whole church was completely rebuilt in the 15th century.

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The ringing room used to be on the ground floor, but it is now raised up a level and looks out over the congregation, separated by just a 3ft high glass panel. The church contains box pews from the 17th and early 18th centuries.

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Jacqueline and Linda.

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Dalton girls, Jacqueline, Rachel and Linda.

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There is a ring of eight bells. The oldest of these were cast in 1602 and 1617 by William Oldfield of York, one was cast in 1785 by Robert Dalton, and fourth was by John Warner & Sons and is dated 1897. The other four bells were cast by Eijsbouts in 2002.

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Andy took the next three photos that actually include me ringing. We were ringing Grandsire Triples again and I was once again on the tenor.

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A look of total concentration!

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A view to the ringing room from the front of the church.

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Some of the posh box pews.

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Inside on the wall was a document signed by Oliver Cromwell. (AP)

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Carl looks up to the ringing room.

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Our last church was St. Akelda's in Giggleswick. The building is grade l listed and dates mostly from the 15th century, but carved stones discovered during the restoration of 1890–92 indicated that a building existed on the site before the Norman Conquest.

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The ringing room has a view over the congregation, but is totally separated by glass. There are steps up to a trap door which is closed for ringing. There is not much room for spectators.

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Ian and Stan look out over the church between rings.

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Andy has the time to pose for a photo even whilst he is ringing!

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A Dipper on the banks of the stream that runs down by the road outside the church. (AP)

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A group photo of those that made it to the end! Photo courtesy of Owen.

An excellent day where St Mary’s Tower Captain, Stan, could indulge his fetish for all manner of weird and wonderful methods….Double Court, Cambridge Surprise, Double Norwich, Oxford, Little Bob and Plain Bob spliced, Stedman Triples, to name but a few! A well satisfied man! 😉

Thanks to Andy Pollock (AP), St. James’ Tower Captain, for letting me include some of his photos, and to Carl and Rachel Hallows for the car ride to towers new.

Next year we go to Lytham St. Annes. This is a statement not a warning. 🙂

Jo

 

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